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Facebook Acknowledges It Has Been Keeping Records of Android Users’ Calls and Texts
#1
Quote:On the same day that the state of Illinois sued Facebook over its alleged misuse of data that allowed Cambridge Analytica to download information on more than 50 million users, Facebook confirmed that it had been collecting and storing call logs and text message metadata for millions of Android users.

Last week, one user who downloaded his data to learn what Facebook knew about him in the aftermath of the Cambridge Analytica scandal found that the company had a record of the date, time, duration, and recipient of calls he had made from the past few years. On Saturday, the tech news site Ars Technica published an account of several others—all Android users—who found similar records.

In response, Facebook published a post Sunday denying that it ever logged call or text history without a user’s permission. But it did acknowledge that it was collecting and storing these logs, attributing it to an opt-in feature for those using Messenger or Facebook Lite on an Android device. “This helps you find and stay connected with the people you care about, and provides you with a better experience across Facebook,” the company said in the post. “People have to expressly agree to use this feature.

“We introduced this feature for Android users a couple of years ago. Contact importers are fairly common among social apps and services as a way to more easily find the people you want to connect with.”

Ars Technica refuted their claim that everyone knowingly opted in. Instead, Ars Technica’s Sean Gallagher claimed, that opt-in was the default setting and users were not separately alerted to it. Nor did Facebook ever say publicly that it was collecting that information. “Facebook says that the company keeps the data secure and does not sell it to third parties,” Gallagher wrote. “But the post doesn’t address why it would be necessary to retain not just the numbers of contacts from phone calls and SMS messages, but the date, time, and length of those calls for years.”
On Monday, in response to the Cambridge Analytica scandal, the Federal Trade Commission announced it was launching a probe into Facebook’s privacy practices. 

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Thank god I stopped using Facebook Dank
[Image: Yt3HqI5.png]

"In the criminal justice system, sexually-based offenses are considered especially heinous. In New York City, the dedicated detectives who investigate these vicious felonies are members of an elite squad known as the Special Victims Unit. These are their stories."
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#2
I'm glad I don't have Facebook.
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#3
Big Brother's watching us, and it isn't the NSA  Eyeballs

This is just surreal! The only ones who should be keeping track of these kinds of things should be your phone company, not a social media app (and even then who knows...)
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#4
(03-28-2018, 05:09 PM)LoopyPanda Wrote: Big Brother's watching us, and it isn't the NSA  Eyeballs

This is just surreal! The only ones who should be keeping track of these kinds of things should be your phone company, not a social media app (and even then who knows...)

Best part about this is that Facebook isn't the only one. Tons of social media services, such as Twitter, most likely, are selling your data as we speak.
[Image: Yt3HqI5.png]

"In the criminal justice system, sexually-based offenses are considered especially heinous. In New York City, the dedicated detectives who investigate these vicious felonies are members of an elite squad known as the Special Victims Unit. These are their stories."
DUN DUN

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#5
(03-29-2018, 03:06 AM)ShineCero Wrote:
(03-28-2018, 05:09 PM)LoopyPanda Wrote: Big Brother's watching us, and it isn't the NSA  Eyeballs

This is just surreal! The only ones who should be keeping track of these kinds of things should be your phone company, not a social media app (and even then who knows...)

Best part about this is that Facebook isn't the only one. Tons of social media services, such as Twitter, most likely, are selling your data as we speak.

Is that even legal? I know unfortunately congress passed something so ISPs can sell your browser history or something but I don't think that extended to websites. Or was that always legal? I've always been pretty guarded about any social media I use my real name anywhere on personally. But well, if there's any way to describe this: 


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#6
(03-30-2018, 07:22 AM)JamesYTP Wrote:
(03-29-2018, 03:06 AM)ShineCero Wrote:
(03-28-2018, 05:09 PM)LoopyPanda Wrote: Big Brother's watching us, and it isn't the NSA  Eyeballs

This is just surreal! The only ones who should be keeping track of these kinds of things should be your phone company, not a social media app (and even then who knows...)

Best part about this is that Facebook isn't the only one. Tons of social media services, such as Twitter, most likely, are selling your data as we speak.

Is that even legal? I know unfortunately congress passed something so ISPs can sell your browser history or something but I don't think that extended to websites. Or was that always legal? I've always been pretty guarded about any social media I use my real name anywhere on personally. But well, if there's any way to describe this: 




As far as I'm aware, there is no law in the United States that companies cannot sell personal data regarding their consumers to other companies. Perhaps in countries such as Germany, but as far as legality concerns in the United States, it's either depended on the state (which is already muddy), poorly implemented or flat out does not exist at the moment In the eyes of Facebook, "....Yes - Facebook's customers are not you, me or other individuals, but companies. Individuals and their data are the product, not the customer.", and earned multiple warnings by the FTC about them selling data of users and promised they would stop or based it on limited stuff: they continue to do so as they please anyways. Heck, even your phone provider is selling your personal data. 

Here's an excerpt I found regarding selling of personal data:


Quote:"Home Depot, The Wall Street Journal, Photobucket, and hundreds of other websites share visitor's names, usernames, or other personal information with advertisers or other third parties, often without disclosing the practice in privacy policies, academic researchers said.

Sixty-one percent of websites tested by researchers from Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society leaked the personal information, sometimes to dozens of third-party partners. Home Depot, for example, disclosed the first names and email addresses of visitors who clicked on an ad to 13 companies. The Wall Street Journal divulged to seven of its partners the email address of users who enter the wrong password. And Photobucket handed over the usernames of those who use the site to share images with their friends."
[Image: Yt3HqI5.png]

"In the criminal justice system, sexually-based offenses are considered especially heinous. In New York City, the dedicated detectives who investigate these vicious felonies are members of an elite squad known as the Special Victims Unit. These are their stories."
DUN DUN

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#7
Not sure why this is surprise, it is known that these companies collect and sell data, even Apple and Google do it.
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1
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#8
Quote:"Home Depot, The Wall Street Journal, Photobucket, and hundreds of other websites share visitor's names, usernames, or other personal information with advertisers or other third parties, often without disclosing the practice in privacy policies, academic researchers said.

Sixty-one percent of websites tested by researchers from Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society leaked the personal information, sometimes to dozens of third-party partners. Home Depot, for example, disclosed the first names and email addresses of visitors who clicked on an ad to 13 companies. The Wall Street Journal divulged to seven of its partners the email address of users who enter the wrong password. And Photobucket handed over the usernames of those who use the site to share images with their friends."

If they said that they wouldn't in writing and didn't I'd be almost certain of that being a crime since that could count as false advertising or something I think technically right? Since you're publicly giving consumers misleading info about the product in making a public statement like that. But it's somewhat unnerving that that isn't illegal unless they state somewhere that they'd do this at the very least. 
 
(03-31-2018, 05:51 PM)Tadashi Wrote: Not sure why this is surprise, it is known that these companies collect and sell data, even Apple and Google do it.

Oh yeah well I knew they obviously at least sold some of the things you search for to ad companies and stuff to use for targeted advertisement. But a lot of what you store on Facebook is more private information than "this person googled garden hoses on shopping".
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#9
(04-02-2018, 02:02 AM)JamesYTP Wrote:
Quote:"Home Depot, The Wall Street Journal, Photobucket, and hundreds of other websites share visitor's names, usernames, or other personal information with advertisers or other third parties, often without disclosing the practice in privacy policies, academic researchers said.

Sixty-one percent of websites tested by researchers from Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society leaked the personal information, sometimes to dozens of third-party partners. Home Depot, for example, disclosed the first names and email addresses of visitors who clicked on an ad to 13 companies. The Wall Street Journal divulged to seven of its partners the email address of users who enter the wrong password. And Photobucket handed over the usernames of those who use the site to share images with their friends."

If they said that they wouldn't in writing and didn't I'd be almost certain of that being a crime since that could count as false advertising or something I think technically right? Since you're publicly giving consumers misleading info about the product in making a public statement like that. But it's somewhat unnerving that that isn't illegal unless they state somewhere that they'd do this at the very least. 
 
(03-31-2018, 05:51 PM)Tadashi Wrote: Not sure why this is surprise, it is known that these companies collect and sell data, even Apple and Google do it.

Oh yeah well I knew they obviously at least sold some of the things you search for to ad companies and stuff to use for targeted advertisement. But a lot of what you store on Facebook is more private information than "this person googled garden hoses on shopping".

I suppose so; it's all in the mix bag since there's nothing suggest that they can't sell your info to others, considering that other sites, as Tadashi said, do it to some extent (some more than others). It's really no different than how the United States Government peaks into the private lives of Americans (in more apparent ways than Facebook).
[Image: Yt3HqI5.png]

"In the criminal justice system, sexually-based offenses are considered especially heinous. In New York City, the dedicated detectives who investigate these vicious felonies are members of an elite squad known as the Special Victims Unit. These are their stories."
DUN DUN

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#10
yeah, I think it's hilarious that the US government, who spawned "FBI agent spying on me" memes for months straight because they're believed to spy on us all the time, is ragging on Mark Zuckerborg for doing basically the same thing  thinks

there are other phone apps that likely do this besides Facebook. Meitu was a face-filter app rumored to be used by the Chinese government as a form of spying on their citizens (Idk if it has been debunked yet, but there were a few articles that came out about it), and Snapchat was also put under fire for a while over personal information/revealing your locations to others before it was debunked/people figured out a way to disable it. It's all in the permissions, which are suspect if they are enabled by default and don't ask you to gain access beforehand.
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